Inconvenient Truth

I used to ask God, “Why?”

I rarely got any sort of an answer so I stopped asking.

(But I confess, I never stopped wondering.)

I’ve heard good Christians tell me that “THE Answer” was that I had to learn to live with all my unanswered questions.

(That didn’t help much either.)

I don’t believe a broken heart is about getting answers anyway.

(Not really.)

I believe mostly it’s about what Ann Voskamp said in her book, The Broken Way—it’s about communion. It’s about wanting someone to come close in our pain. Feel close. It is the aloneness we feel in our brokenness that magnifies all our other stuff.

For Prodigals this is especially acute, for the communion, they most desperately need—is also the thing they most fear.

Where do they go then?

What do you do with your wounded heart, when your once “safe place” has become to you the image of Habakkuk’s Vineyard?

Where do you begin to look for a PLACE of healing and hope and strength to believe again?

Is there such a place?

There are many prodigals who would not hesitate to answer a loud and resounding, “No!” Especially if you are presenting today’s Church as your answer to that Safe Place!

They’ve been there—bought the tee shirt.

They’ll gladly show you the blood-stains, pointing out all the bullet holes!

(What do you say to that one then?)

That Outcast who looks at The Church and sees a carefully camouflaged Enemy lurking there?

Do you say, “Just trust us? We’re different. We’re the REAL thing!”

(And if they’ve heard all that before?)

If they know The Church in their past is guilty of shooting it’s wounded?

Then what?

What if the inconvenient truth is this?

We have met the enemy—and he is us.

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